A Few Words About Costuming

The cast of "Prisoner of Joy"Prisoner of Joy:

By and large, the cast wore their own black street clothes (ladies all in skirts and tops, men in pants and shirts–some button-down and some pullover. Kayla made all the final decisions about who wore what piece of fabric for accent. She also decided that each man who played a character role (e.g., Dennis Nichols, who played Luke; Adam Bodnar who played an official; Ron Stauss who played Silas; et al.)  in the flashbacks would simply pull his fabric shawl up to cover his head. It was quick, simple, and noticeably different.

"I command you, in the name of Jesus Christ, to come out of her!"Kayla also designed the piece that the slave girl wore, which was easily converted into the head covering she wore after joining the church at Philippi. Because jewelry was worn particularly by pagans at that time and place, none of the women in the church are wearing any jewelry. The slave girl removes all of hers after Paul casts the demon out of her.

 

Three church women do interpretative movement to the hymn found in Philippians 2.

Three church women do interpretative movement to the hymn found in Philippians 2.

 

Rachel Wilhelm Photography  (54)A Mighty Fortress:

When this play was done on tour, the actor playing Luther wore a simple black tunic which suggested both a generic medieval garment and a monk’s robe. However, we were looking for something more for this fully-staged version. Since Luther was hiding in a castle, wearing borrowed clothes, we went hunting for period portraits of German knights. Here are some we found:

German Lord and Lady, 16th C.

German Lord and Lady, 16th C.

German "Land Knights" (foot soldiers)--known for their colorful and avant garde clothing

German “Land Knights” (foot soldiers)–known for their colorful and avant garde clothing

A German merchant in 1531. Note that the middle class is now able to afford rich dress

A German merchant in 1531. Note that the middle class is now able to afford rich dress

We wanted Luther to wear some color, and found the perfect fabric in afO’s collection. A collarless linen shirt under a sleeveless tunic was easy and gave the general impression of medieval middle class status, when worn with tights and soft shoes. A hooded black cape was added shortly after the start of the play when Luther becomes a monk. Since most men wore dark long coats over their tunics, this cape did double duty, suggesting both a coat and a monk’s robe. During one nighttime scene toward the play’s end, Jeff did put the hood up onto his head.

Special thanks to Kayla Reed for sewing Luther’s tunic, and to Jeanne Pendleton at IPFW’s Costume Shop, for providing the tall boots Luther wears at the top of the show. She also donated the fabric we used to make Luther’s bed cover.

Jeff Salisbury as Martin Luther, in the opening moments of the play.

Jeff Salisbury as Martin Luther, in the opening moments of the play.

 

Rachel Wilhelm Photography  (86)

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About godsbooklover

I'm a Christ-follower, a writer, a voracious reader, and a piano teacher. I'm married to my best friend and we have two grown sons and a gorgeous granddaughter. I am the Artistic Director of a theatre ministry. And in my "spare" time, I blog.

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